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  • 10 Feb 2019 1:12 PM
    Message # 7156638
    Rachel Albright (Administrator)

    Do you have any interesting articles about transit?  Post them here!

    via GIPHY

    Last modified: 10 Feb 2019 1:27 PM | Rachel Albright (Administrator)
  • 10 Feb 2019 1:13 PM
    Reply # 7156639 on 7156638
    Rachel Albright (Administrator)

    Opportunities for Increasing Sustainable Transport: Spotlight on Dallas, Denver, Nashville

    The objective of this report is to understand how U.S. cities are implementing sustainable transport and shifting away from drive-alone trips.

    The dominant mobility paradigm in many U.S. cities limits access to goods and services for people without a car, especially the elderly, children, disabled people, and low-income families. Meanwhile, the transport sector is the largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions(GHG) in the U.S., generating 28.5% of all emissions.18 Transport GHG is growing at a faster rate than other sectors. The long-term potential to mitigate these realities and increase access to opportunities for all people within cities will depend on a shift toward sustainable transport and away from drive-alone trips. Cities succeeding in the paradigm shift are evaluating existing travel behavior and setting measurable mode split targets. As a result, these cities are better able to monitor mobility services and expand infrastructure investments.

    Read More


  • 10 Feb 2019 1:13 PM
    Reply # 7156640 on 7156638
    Rachel Albright (Administrator)

    Inside the Transportation Data Tug of War

    • Historically, cities and new mobility companies(like Uber and Lyft) have had tense relationships due to regulatory battles. 
    • The new fight is over the data these companies collect. Cities want access to this data to better understand how and where these services are operating & the transportation needs of their city; but the companies don’t want to provide it due to concerns about how disclosing it may affect their business.
    • Cities like New York City and Chicago have created regulations on transportation network companies(TNCs) that require the sharing of data including pickup and drop off locations, lengths and times of trips, and the number of passengers in each trip; Chicago also decided to place a per-ride taxon trips.
    • TNC companies state that there are privacy protection risks in sharing this data. Some people say that city departments aren’t prepared to process the data they might have and need. Other TNCs feel that their success relies upon their alignment and partnership with cities.

    Read More


  • 10 Feb 2019 1:13 PM
    Reply # 7156641 on 7156638
    Rachel Albright (Administrator)

    Stuck and Stressed: The Health Costs of Traffic

    • The physical and psychological toll of brutal commutes can be considerable.
    • According to an analysis by the Texas A&M Transportation Institute, the average American commuter spends 42 hours per year stuck in rush-hour traffic.
    • Idling vehicles add pollution, which has environmental and health consequences. Another toll is to psychological well-being, stemming from the sense of helplessness we experience in traffic, and its unpredictability.
    • LA is responding. They have put in a system that charges solo drivers more to use certain lanes of the I-10 and I-110 highways during periods of heavy traffic. Certain West Coast cities are making sweeping expansions of their public transit systems, and many cities are adding bike lanes. AV vehicles might be another option in the future.

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  • 10 Feb 2019 1:13 PM
    Reply # 7156642 on 7156638
    Rachel Albright (Administrator)

    The Great Divide in How Americans Commute to Work

    • Americans cleave into two distinct nations based on commuting: One, based in smaller, less advantaged, and more sprawling metros, depends on the car, while the other, based in large, denser, more advantaged, and more educated metros, uses a variety of alternative modes.
    • Size and density are positively and significantly associated with using transit, biking, walking, carpooling, and working from home.
    • People are less likely to drive to work alone and to use alternate modes in metros where more adults are college graduates.
    • The share of workers who are members of the knowledge-based creative class is positively associated with using transit, biking, or walking to get to work, as well as working from home, and it is negatively associated with driving alone to work. The same holds for the local concentration of high-tech industry jobs.

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  • 10 Feb 2019 1:14 PM
    Reply # 7156643 on 7156638
    Rachel Albright (Administrator)

    Why Transit Equity Matters

    Montgomery’s buses, in A Testament of Hope, Martin Luther King Jr. drew the connection between access to affordable public transit and employment opportunity.

    King made the case that transit systems did not do enough to help poor people access opportunities for gainful, meaningful employment, leading him to conclude that urban transit systems were“a genuine civil rights issue.”

    Central to the concept of transit equity is the notion that transit is a fundamental public good that we all benefit from, regardless of age, race, or class. Transit’s immense value to disadvantaged communities is key to King’s framing of transit as a civil right, but public transit’s cascading economic effects impact all of us.

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  • 10 Feb 2019 1:14 PM
    Reply # 7156644 on 7156638
    Rachel Albright (Administrator)

    The New Automobility: Lyft, Uber and the Future of American Cities

    A Report made in July of 2018 found that companies like Uber and Lyft appear to be diverting more people from public transit than from driving themselves, and that the proliferation of these services is actually putting more cars on the road, measured in vehicle miles traveled. 

    Read the Report


  • 10 Feb 2019 1:14 PM
    Reply # 7156646 on 7156638
    Rachel Albright (Administrator)

    Bringing a Human Dimension to Public Transit Planning & Equity in Mobility

    Transport serves as a significant ‘gateway’ service that can either bolster or erode all of the factors that support a high quality of life.  A new study brings issues of social equity to the table, amplifying the ways in which we need to be more modest in our expectations of transportation alternatives and more proactive in defining them.

    Read the Overview


    Last modified: 10 Feb 2019 1:14 PM | Rachel Albright (Administrator)
  • 10 Feb 2019 1:14 PM
    Reply # 7156647 on 7156638
    Rachel Albright (Administrator)

    User fees should incentivize sustainable trips, not fund transportation

    The United States needs to rethink its approach to transportation taxation. An over-reliance on“user fees” frames transportation as a question of who is paying their fair share and who really deserves access to the street.

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  • 10 Feb 2019 1:15 PM
    Reply # 7156648 on 7156638
    Rachel Albright (Administrator)

    What Cities are Getting Wrong About Public Transportation

    Cities could get more people walking, biking, and riding transit, according to a new report, if they just know where to look for improvement.

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